Category Archives: Cairn Curran

Australian pelican in flight

Australian Pelicans don’t quite match White-bellied Sea-eagle for ‘wow’ factor but they are still well worth capturing in flight. This bird was spotted in the company of sea-eagles earlier in the week at Welshman’s Reef.

Australian Pelican, Welshman’s Reef, 14th August 2017

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Sea-eagles #3

Better light and a closer approach this time.

These images were collected just moments after I witnessed a thrilling encounter between two White-bellied Sea-eagles and a lone Wedge-tailed Eagle that had apparently transgressed into their territory. More on that later.

White-bellied Sea-eagle (immature), Welshman’s Reef, 14th August 2017

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Wedge-tailed Eagle and White-bellied Sea-eagle duelling

Sea-eagles #2

Another episode from my fraternising with sea-eagles at the weekend. This ‘pair’ consists of an immature/subadult, seen here arriving at the perch to disturb its partner, a fully fledged adult bird. White-bellied Sea-eagles are a joy to behold in flight – I feel so fortunate to be able to see them on a regular basis.

White-bellied Sea-eagles, Welshman’s Reef, 13th August 2017

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Sea-eagles #1

This is one of two immature White-bellied Sea-eagles seen late yesterday near Welshman’s Reef – what a majestic sight!

White-bellied Sea-eagle, Welshman’s Reef, 13th August 2017

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Balancing act

This Willie Wagtail provided a cameo performance at Picnic Point recently – leaving its perch to snatch a tiny insect from the surface of the lake with wonderful dexterity.

Willie Wagtail, Cairn Curran (near Picnic Point), 2nd August 2017

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Flight patterns

Birds in flight – the ultimate challenge for a bird photographer … never mastered but always joyful.

Pacific Black Duck, Cairn Curran, 2nd August 2017

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Red-capped Plovers

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In golden light

It’s great to see the Red-capped Plovers at Cairn Curran colouring up nicely in advance of breeding. The differences between the male and female are evident in these shots – I quite like the subtle tones of the female, especially in the golden late afternoon light of winter.

Over the next month or so they’ll select a nest site well away from the water and lay their eggs into a small scrape. The nests are incredibly hard to find in my experience. The adults will move quietly away from the nest at the slightest sign of danger and the site is always incredibly well disguised.

Red-capped Plover (male), Cairn Curran Reservoir, 2nd August 2017

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Red-capped Plover (female)

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III … with a yawn!