Category Archives: Honeyeaters

It’s my turn now …

When the Rainbow Lorikeets, Red Wattlebirds, Galahs and rosellas aren’t monopolising the birds baths, a suite of smaller species flock in for their turn. I’ve also heard a Black-chinned Honeyeater in the garden this morning – we sometimes see them during autumn as they disperse from their breeding sites in the surrounding bush.

Juvenile Brown-headed Honeyeater, Wyndham Street Newstead, 12th March 2017

Brown-headed Honeyeater (adult)

Female Spotted Pardalote

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White-naped Honeyeater

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Pool days #3

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Brown-headed Honeyeater, Pound Lane Newstead, 22nd February 2017

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Diamond Firetail (female)

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White-browed Babbler

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White-plumed Honeyeater (imm.)

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Yellow-tufted Honeyeater (imm.)

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Pool days #1

As mentioned in an earlier post this small dam on Pound Lane has proved a nice spot to while away an hour during the week. A procession of woodland birds visit the pool in the late afternoon – what has been especially pleasing is the number of juvenile birds – Diamond Firetail, Dusky Woodswallow, Yellow-tufted and White-plumed Honeyeaters in good numbers and evidence of a successful breeding season just gone.

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White-browed Babbler, Pound Lane, 19th February 2017

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Yellow-tufted Honeyeater

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Juvenile Dusky Woodswallow

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Diamond Firetail (adult female)

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Juvenile Diamond Firetail

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Weight of numbers

For as long as we’ve lived in town Red Wattlebirds have pretty much ruled the roost in our garden. They will guard areas of flowering trees, such as the large Yellow Gums and Red Ironbarks in our yard and surrounding streets. Smaller nectarivorous birds, such as various honeyeaters and lorikeets are repeatedly harassed and chased away from blossoms by the large and aggressive wattlebirds. That has been the way things operate in town.

With the recent arrival of some moderate sized flocks of Rainbow Lorikeets it appears the ‘natural order’ of things may be shifting.

A heavy flowering of Drooping Mistletoe in the Yellow Gums is attracting the Rainbow Lorikeets in numbers and they seem to be winning the battle with the resident wattlebirds. Even though the wattlebirds can successfully chase off a lorikeet the sheer weight of numbers is enabling the small groups of lorikeets to successfully guard the clumps of mistletoe, much to the annoyance of the wattlebirds.

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Rainbow Lorikeet feeding in Drooping Mistletoe, Newstead, 21st February 2017

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The Red Wattlebird’s lament

Hot, hot, hot

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White-naped Honeyeaters, Newstead, 10th February 2017

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Crimson Rosella keeping cool amongst the vines

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Spotted Pardalote

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Female Superb Fairy-wren

Back to the waterhole

As the summer rolls on and the first run of hot days are behind us water is becoming scarce in the bush, apart from at the bush dams which filled nicely during spring.

This small waterhole is one of the last ones in the Mia Mia – hopefully a January cloudburst will replenish things.

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Mia Mia waterhole, 3rd January 2017

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Brown-headed Honeyeater

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Fuscous Honeyeater

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Yellow-tufted Honeyeater

Pool opening

The opening of the Newstead Pool is always eagerly anticipated in our local community.

Out in the Mia Mia the birds are spoilt for choice at the moment … I wonder how things will look in March?

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The Mia Mia Pool, 11th December 2016 … not a lifeguard in sight!

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Black-chinned Honeyeater

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Fuscous Honeyeater

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Yellow-tufted Honeyeater

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