Author Archives: Geoff Park

A bit of a stretch

The beauty of sitting quietly by water, is that once the birds … and mammals grow accustomed to your presence they’ll often produce some pretty neat behaviours. I highly recommend it!

Rainbow Bee-eater, South German Track, 17th February 2019

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Black-fronted Dotterel

Male Common Bronzewing

Eastern Grey Kangaroos … I’ve been chasing this shot for a while!

Where did you spring from?

I was pleasantly surprised to encounter two pairs of Banded Lapwings last evening near Rodborough.

A large plover, the Banded Lapwing is similar in form to its larger relative, the Masked Lapwing, but has a number of distinguishing features. Two of these are evident in the images below – the bold, black U-shaped breast-band and the red wattles at the base of the bill. In flight they also display an obvious diagonal white wing-bar.

Banded Lapwing, Clarke’s Road Moolort Plains, 19th February 2019

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Banded Lapwings are irregular visitors to the district – I’ve come across them mainly in the autumn and have never found them breeding locally, unlike Masked Lapwings. They prefer open, bare paddocks and often occur in small flocks of up to a dozen birds.

Show stealers

These Red-rumped Parrots stole the show during a visit to the bush dam on South German Track at the weekend.

As the list below indicates there is more to see and hear around this shrinking pool as summer marches on.

Red-rumped Parrot (male in moult), South German Track, 17th February 2019

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Adult female

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List: Crested Bellbird, Rainbow Bee-eater, Sacred Kingfisher, Crested Shrike-tit, Shining Bronze-cuckoo, Black-chinned Honeyeater, Collared Sparrowhawk, Diamond Firetail, Peaceful Dove, Common Bronzewing, White-naped Honeyeater, Grey Currawong, Yellow-tufted Honeyeater, Striated Pardalote, Spotted Pardalote, Dusky Woodswallow, Eastern Rosella.

A good week

It’s been a good week for nocturnal birds.

Pleasing to see Barking Owls about and hopefully breeding in 2019.

PS … click on the images to enlarge.

Barking Owl, Newstead area, 17th February 2019

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The other half of the pair

Well done Ninox

It’s been a tough summer for birds, so any evidence of successful breeding is to be celebrated … especially so when it involves Powerful Owls.

This juvenile is growing fast, but it still has a few months to enjoy with its parents. They’ll start nesting again in the depths of winter – in the meantime a steady diet off rabbits, possums and birds will hopefully see it through to adulthood.

The second image in this set shows clearly why this species is classified as one of the hawk-owls, genus Ninox.

Juvenile Powerful Owl, Baringhup area, 16th February 2019

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It’s wake up time!

Just as the rest of us are starting to wind down for the day Tawny Frogmouths are preparing for the night ahead.

A few stretches and a yawn or two are a sign of limbering up in the frogmouth world.

Tawny Frogmouth @ Newstead Natives, 15th February 2019

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Friday’s offering

I’ve run out of steam this week … so here’s some images sans words!

Red-rumped Parrot, South German Track, 11th February 2019

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Black-fronted Dotterel