Unseasonal

Late summer and early autumn rain has triggered sone unseasonal breeding activity.

White-faced Herons, a common local waterbird, often breed some distance away from the waterbodies they frequent when hunting food.

This nest, secreted in a clump of mistletoe in a tall Grey Box is home to two well-grown chicks. A third nestling appears to have succumbed, perhaps the result of competition for food with its stronger siblings.

One parent arrived as I watched on, alighting nervously on a nearby clump of mistletoe before proceeding to attend the chicks.

WFH1

White-faced Heron chicks, Newstead, 30th March 2022

WFH2

II

WFH3

One of the parents

WFH4

II

WFH5

III

9 responses to “Unseasonal

  1. Interesting that they are still in breeding progress. The White-faced Herons around here seem to have completed the cycle. Although they are so tricky to find it’s easy to miss them I guess.

  2. nulgerong@westnet.com.au

    Good morning Geoff,I’d just like to let you know that your posts make my day bright.I have been a long time birdo  and am now in care and movement restricted.. ie wheelie walker!!It really is amazing how the birds take advantage of the seasonal weather to breed.Maybe this will become the norm in this time of changing climate.Your photography is top class. Thankyou very much for sharing it. Eileen

  3. White-faced herons seem tolerant of urbanisation. I’ve seen them on many creeks in Melbourne.

  4. Marg McDonald

    I heard a Birdlife Australia man tell how important mistletoe is to general bush diversity. It’s not just the Mistletoe bird that needs it – it provides an excellent nesting site for other birds – not to mention the insect and reptile food and habitat source.

  5. Peter Mitchell

    I read a similar report of un-seasonal breeding from Yea – see https://focusonfauna.com/2022/03/29/opportunist-nesters/

  6. Thanks for the photos Geoff. You might be interested in this tribute to a humming bird. Bella Hummingbird’s Stream Is Ending | A look Back Through the Years – YouTube Peter

  7. Patrick Kavanagh

    It was interesting on our recent trip to Renmark to see lots of Whistling Kites building nests. Fascinating insight and great photos, Geoff

  8. Noticed 7 tiny chicks following/huddling around a pair of Grey Teal on the farm dam a couple of days ago.

  9. They had such a pleasant time earlier in the year that they decided to come back to the same place now. Obviously additions to the family on the way.

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