Talking summer in winter … perfect timing

In early March this year, a call went out to Newsteadians to come and join a discussion about our experience of living through drier, hotter summers like the one we had just and how we might manage future ones. “Talking Summer” was an informal gathering providing a forum for people to talk about their fears and ideas for living well in a changed climate. This meeting gave birth to two exciting actions;

Firstly, a submission for the Victorian Government’s Community Climate Change Adaptation fund (3CA) lead by Janet Barker and Kate Tucker on behalf of the Newstead community. In short the grant submission outlines a community-led ‘treescape’ initiative to purchase and plant at least 100 advanced trees to provide cooler and greener canopy for our communal areas around town supported by education, neighbourhood engagement and local expertise. We will not hear back about this results of the grant submission until end of July.

Our beautiful elms may have almost ‘run their race’ … what might we plant in their place and reprise the wisdom of our elders?

Secondly, an offer by Sandon local Ross Uebergang, a Swinburne University Lecture of Landscape Design, for his students to research and design a township treescape plan for Newstead with the aim of giving us more shade and cooler zones around our most active precincts. Their work includes research on Newstead’s historical context, contemporary usage patterns, horticultural and urban landscape best practices.

We are pleased to advise that Swinburne Landscape Design students have completed their class assignment to design a township plan for a cooler, greener Newstead. Hooray!

Now, we would like to invite you come to listen and learn about the fruits of their labour on our behalf. We see the students work as one input, and not the final say on how we might design an improved ‘climate ready treescape’ for the Newstead of 2050 to help us maintain our liveability and mobility in the face of future climate change. We are excited to see how they envisage a cohesive and functional solution for Newstead.

A planted Red Ironbark in Canrobert Street – our current streetscapes are a great mix of native and exotic trees … perhaps a blueprint for the future?

So come along to this interactive session and enjoy the best thinking from these enthusiastic and informed young professionals.

When and where: 1pm -2.30pm, Sunday June 23rd @ the Mechanics Hall, 9 Lyons Street. Newstead light lunch and cuppas provided.

Any queries feel free to contact Kate Tucker (kate@inhereconsulting.com.au) … also RSVP for catering purposes via an email or 0409 996 561.

The Plane tree outside the Old Newstead Courthouse … it has shown increasing signs of stress over recent summers.

Remnant Yellow Gums … they are tough, look terrific and wonderful for wildlife. Looking after these will be just as important as planting new ones.

5 responses to “Talking summer in winter … perfect timing

  1. Howard Thomson

    Robert Thomson

    On Tue, 18 Jun 2019 at 7:00 pm, Natural Newstead wrote:

    > Geoff Park posted: “In early March this year, a call went out to > Newsteadians to come and join a discussion about our experience of living > through drier, hotter summers like the one we had just and how we might > manage future ones. “Talking Summer” was an informal gathering p” >

  2. susan lanchester

    Geoff i would dearly like to come but i am not well enough at the moment but would like to suggest that a mixture of natives and exotic would and could look great. please note the mistletoe in the photo of the gum,
    these will if not cut out will eventually kill it. food for thought. sue woodend nth

  3. Mr Newstead this comment bears no relationship to your beautiful Eucalypt photos. I realized today that this is the time of year when I always start to look for Ravens with twigs in their beaks as I have observed that nest building for these starts so often in June.

  4. Dear Geoff
    you are on to something here. I live in Adelaide and watched the millennium drought take its toll on our parks, gardens and street trees. Many of the conifers and superb deciduous trees will not endure in our changing climate. Mallees will be more suited for us as we dry and warm – at least for 50 years or so and then I am not sure what will survive.

    Allan

  5. Erica Jane Higgins

    Wonderful news story on a town making a better future with forward planning.

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