Look at me … I’m here to stay!

Late this afternoon I was distracted from the keyboard for a few minutes by the incessant squawking of a Blue-faced Honeyeater, sheltering from the drizzle in an ironbark near our driveway.

This sound is becoming a ‘feature’ of the evolving soundscapes of many towns in southern Australia where certain highly adaptable bird species, largely from northern climes, are moving in. The Blue-faced Honeyeater is an aggressive and competitive species, but it’s a relative newcomer to the district, having arrived in small numbers a couple of years ago. I suspect they are here to stay, so we might as well get used to their noisy vocalisations and enjoy their distinctive character.

Blue-faced Honeyeater, Wyndham Street Newstead, 13th June 2018

3 responses to “Look at me … I’m here to stay!

  1. Brian Fry , friend of Rob Youl and late Ron Hateley

    I live near the Kennington Reservoir in Bendigo and have watched numerous specimens of this bird over the last 8 -10 years. They are seen throughout the year and last spring 3 hatchlings roosted in my yard for a couple of days

    • Dear Brian, good to hear from you and thanks for the reminder about Rob and Ron – both very good friends. Interesting note about BFHEs – I can recall seeing them in Bendigo when I started working there in 1998 but they have been slowly working their way south it seems. All the best, Geoff

  2. David Merrick

    Blue Faced Honey-eaters were common in Maiden Gully 20 years ago. I also used to see them in Strathfieldsaye and near the Epalock school, but never as far south as Sedgwick. Cheers
    David

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