The path to our door

There was quite a variety of treats in store for me on a trip back from Newstead to our place at Strangways last Saturday. First up was a beautiful foggy scene on the flats of the Jim Crow Creek.

Morning on the floodplain of the Jim Crow Creek at Strangways

Morning fog on Jim Crow Creek

As I drove up our lane, I was delighted to see a pair of Restless Flycatchers Myiagra inquieta hovering and catching insects. They have been a bit shy of the cameraman until this day when they let me get to within 5 metres whilst they hunted in the winter sun.

Restless Flycatcher (Myiagra inquieta)

Restless Flycatcher I

Restless Flycatcher (Myiagra inquieta)

Restless Flycatcher II

Restless Flycatcher (Myiagra inquieta)

Catching spiders as well as flies

A pair of Jacky Winters Microeca fascinans was also hunting along the fence line.

Jacky Winter (Microeca fascinans)

Jacky Winter

When I got home after quite some time rolling on the ground getting shots of the birds, for some unknown macrophotographic reason I put on my reading glasses and had good close look at the stone path to our door. I was impressed to find numerous tiny mites with white-spotted black bodies and orange legs. They were from 0.5-1mm long. And with them were some velvety looking grey grubs with six legs and again only 0.5-1mm long. They were quite challenging photographic subjects and I will keep working to try to get some good photos of them. At first I thought the grey ones might be tiny Velvet Worms, but from my reading they would need more legs to qualify. The people at bowerbird.org.au have identified it as a springtail, hexapods once classed as insects, but with internal mouths. The reading I’ve done says that they live on fungi, microbes  and other material in the leaf litter. I wonder if the mites could be Trombidiformes, but would really appreciate any help with identification of either. The grains in the sandstone path give an indication of their size, or lack thereof.

Mite_17-07-16_3

Mite

Tiny

Springtail

Mite and friend

Together

5 responses to “The path to our door

  1. Hi Patrick, they aren’t red-legged earth mite are they? Halotydeus destructor? https://newsteadgarden.wordpress.com/2010/06/22/pesky-mites/

    • Patrick Kavanagh

      Thanks Janet! It certainly looks like the one. the next day there were squillions of them on little herby weeds around the path.

  2. Amazing photos! I have clumps of the red legged ones in any bowls of water in the garden.???

  3. they are particularly attracted to legumes

  4. Yes they love plants! Especially lucerne and other legumes, as Bruce mentioned. They even eat capeweed (yay). Usually the frost kills them and they don’t over winter. Hmmm.

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