The supercharged honeyeater

I’m sure most readers will be aware that the Red Wattlebird, a ubiquitous and prominent inhabitant of home gardens, is actually a honeyeater.

In our garden and surrounds there are about ten of these aggressive, noisy characters – they monopolise nectar sources, the bird baths and high perches, chasing off the smaller birds with relentless enthusiasm. One of the benefits of planting a variety of small shrubs in the garden is that they provide refuges for these smaller birds against the constant wattlebird attacks. Despite their temperament I like Red Wattlebirds – they are a handsome species when seen in brief moments of relaxation.

RW2

Red Wattlebird, 24th April 2016

RW3

II

RW1

III

RW4

IV

3 responses to “The supercharged honeyeater

  1. Well I didn’t know that Red Wattlebirds were actually a honeyeater! We have 2 or 3 in our garden with a plethora of other honeyeaters. Last season I saw white-plumed honeyeaters, fuscous honeyeaters and white-naped honeyeaters together with a couple of willy wagtails work together to herd the wattlebirds away from the garden. I have never seen this before but it was rather fun to watch their successful strategy to move the perceived competition further away. Over-winter two honeyeaters remained in our garden: one a white-plumed and the other a yellow-tufted honeyeater. One basically stayed east of the house and the other west of the house, apparently guarding the correa and emu bush food sources for the next Spring, by which time these two were clearly two of the fattest honeyeaters among the Spring group.

  2. I love the successful living native entity but geez they wreck the joint, and maybe can be habitat manipulated sometimes? like the Bells -which suffered a fair bit locally here after Black Sat weather when the lerps all fell from the trees

  3. The one’s I have encountered are confident and rambunctious. Terrific lighting.

    Ken

    On Tue, Apr 26, 2016 at 9:53 AM, Natural Newstead wrote:

    > Geoff Park posted: “I’m sure most readers will be aware that the Red > Wattlebird, a ubiquitous and prominent inhabitant of home gardens, is > actually a honeyeater. In our garden and surrounds there are about ten of > these aggressive, noisy characters – they monopolise nectar” >

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