Birds of a feather …

How many different types of ‘cockatoos’ in these images?

There are four in all – Long-billed Corellas are in the vast majority, together with a few Little Corellas, Sulphur-crested Cockatoos and Galahs. Spilt grain, a feature of autumn in the local farming landscape is a great attractor.

Corellas1

‘Cockatoos’ feeding on grain, Joyce’s Creek, 1st June 2015.

Corellas2

All four species can be seen in the image … click to enlarge and look carefully!

The Little Corellas can be distinguished by the small crest (not always apparent), shorter bill and lack of red around the head and throat. There are roughly ten in the image above.

Corellas3

A tight-knit flock.

Galahs

Galah pair – always a close partnership.

6 responses to “Birds of a feather …

  1. great shot! The long bills on the LB Corella’s developed to dig out Yam daisy’s I read somewhere.

  2. An overnight stay at Welshman’s Reef caravan park was always made complete with the sound of Galahs screeching in their early morning flights

  3. as always, such wonderful shots;loved the Galah pair perched on the dry branch end. Cheers.

  4. Zimmerman-Clough family

    Hi – I am a new subscriber but just wanted to tell you how much I enjoy your Natural Newstead photos. Going through a bit of bad health at the moment and your brilliant photos are always interesting and beautiful – always cheer me up. Thanks so much! Cheers, Jenny

  5. Is Long-billed always the most common? Are the ratios changing in the Corellas? I think at Yea, the Long-billed was almost unknown a few years ago – ‘corella’ meant Little. But now it is about 50-50.

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